An Encouragement: Who Else Wants Free Writing Tips and Resources?

“Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.” ~Louis L’Amour

I want to encourage you today to write. No, I’m not asking you to sign up for my Writing Imagination Academy. Hopefully, you already have. If not, you know you can always do so at your discretion. As Ernest Hemingway once said, “The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them.” And I trust your decisions.

Setting aside my desire to personally guide you through your story, I want to provide you with as many resources as I can – completely free. That’s one of the main focuses of this blog!

To start off, I want to Re-blog the top ten reasons of why the first draft of your story isn’t complete:

1. You began without preparation.

Before you begin writing your story, minimal preparation that should be done is: Research your story for accuracy (even if you’re creating a world yourself, you should be well aware of what other people are doing); Obtain reference images for your own inspiration; write about the images you have imagined; gain information like character names, places your story will take place in, and so on; and from your inspired and imagined images, create an outline.

2. You haven’t made writing a habit.

In order for your first draft to be written, you need to make writing a daily habit in your life. If you don’t, then you are not a writer but a dabbler.

3. Fear.

You’re too afraid of how your book will be received. For your first draft, it’s best to not think about such things at all. Think of it this way: Your writing is just you and your writing instrument.

4. Editing.

Something I learned years ago, if you want to get through a first draft, don’t edit!!! Write all the way through, and then you can go back and edit. That’s what drafts two and three are for.

5. Discouragement.

You become discouraged when you don’t see your book living up to your expectations. Don’t worry! Rarely, if at all, will a first draft live up to one’s expectations. Remember the quotes at the top of this email. The first draft is a stepping stone.

6. You’re writing too slow.

The longer a first draft drags out, the less chance you have of ever completing it. Why? Because we all have busy lives! Things come up, and soon, it can be easy to shelve your book project. Don’t do this! Write your first draft quickly.

7. Distractions.

Distractions are easy when you have picked the wrong writing environment. Try writing in a different sort of environment and see what happens.

8. Not knowing where to begin.

It is hard to begin some days. You sit down with your writing instrument in hand and don’t know how to get moving. At such a stall, go back to some of the material you collected before you began writing Draft One and look it over. Remember all your inspiration, and try to write about that on your page. After all, that’s supposed to be your story.

9. Having a dis-joint plot.

Sometimes, after writing for a while, you can realize the plot-line you came up with wasn’t the best and should have been tweaked in your outline stage. If this happens, don’t panic. Tweak the plot, but don’t go back to make everything match. Finish the draft. Then you can go back and revise.

10. Not enough words.

Vocabulary is something that can occasionally run dry. You find yourself repeating the same words. Sometimes, this is okay, but make sure that every scene is unique. Even if you mention the word “sunshine” in every chapter twenty times, talk about it in different ways: It’s spilling through limbs and boughs, shooting across the field, rising in the morning, gleaming through the window, beaming behind the mountain.

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You have completed all of my on-boarding blog posts of my products to date. Congrats!

Your fellow writer,
Joshua Reynolds

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Spend 8 Weeks and Write a Novel that Exceeds Your Expectations

We have reached the moment of decision. I know what I’m asking of you. Believe me, I’ve asked it of myself multiple times. It’s that moment when I realize I’m going to take the plunge to write my next book. And trust me: There is nothing so thrilling and adventuresome as the process of crafting your own imagined story!

You have a choice to make: Do what you’ve been doing (or worse, do nothing at all). You know where that will lead. An unfinished book. Embarrassment. Negative reviews. And dissatisfaction with your own manuscript. Is that really where you want to go? Take a new action, and get a new result. Apply for Writing Imagination Academy. Finally get the story you have imagined in your head to a completed manuscript that will exceed your own expectations.

8 weeks. A completed first draft. A road to having your story revised and ready for publication.

. . .or . . .

Several years – still an unfinished manuscript – lost confidence from your friends – and no seeable solution to having your book completed.

Which option do you really want for yourself? Here’s what to do now… Make sure you have signed up to my email by clicking the button at the bottom of this post. Watch the free video training, and send me an email with a couple paragraphs outlining a few things about your book (general plot-line, a few things the main characters do, setting, a few action points from the free video training). It doesn’t have to be detailed. I will be sure to get back with you.

Again, the seats are limited to 50 total. Go to my home page: www.conservativecornerstones.com to see how many seats are left and how much time there is until the next course, and apply today. If accepted, I’ll provide you a link where you may purchase the course for the flat fee of $200, and you have two weeks of the course to opt-in for your %100 Money Back Guarantee. I’m taking all the risk. Hope to see you on the inside!

Your fellow Writer,
Joshua Reynolds

P.S. Still undecided? I still plan to always give more tips and tricks for FREE in future posts! I’ve left you with the decision. The rest is up to you.

P.P.S. Did you know that I always write my first draft on paper? I really do! This is the writing tip of the day. Writing with pen and paper helps push all distractions away, such as the internet, the glowing screen of a computer, the operating system and word processor, etc. I have found that the best way to let my creativity flow is allowing my mind to think and immediately transfer it down to the notebook.

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Lens-Cap, Wing-Nut, Two-Twisty-Ties Productions

Sometimes, it just takes time. I would like to share with you a part of my story.

Getting up every morning to find that the house is below 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Walking outside in close to sub-zero temperatures to haul firewood in. The firewood isn’t ours. I had been hoping the wood I had harvested from our forest last fall would last the entire winter. It had not. So, more wood had to be purchased – and that only meant one thing: poor wood. It was encased in ice. Lighting it was hard; I had to use some of my special ash wood to get the fire going before I put the iced wood atop.

Two fireplaces now roaring. . . taking a quick shower. . .doing some house chores. . .now, at last, I can start on my career for the day. I pull all my video equipment out. It takes half-an-hour to set up. I pull the lens cap off the camera, unscrew a wing-nut from a stand I hang one of my lights on, and unravel two twisty ties binding up a couple cords from my equipment. These items I place in my pocket. Then, I rehearse my video I will be shooting. No one to help me. I’m A1 from pre-production all the way through post-editing.

I have to stop my filming several times because of the rushing water I can hear from the next room that I know my mic picks up. Post-production is tedious as I watch myself and always conclude my performances are not what they should be. Color-grading is a jumble of connecting virtual wires in an open source program to see what will make my video look better. When I strike my gear down, I pull the lens cap, wing nut, and two twisty ties out of my pocket, and I smile. To myself, I’d dubbed my film work Lens-Cap, Wing-Nut, Two-Twisty-Ties Productions.

. . .at the day’s end, I know that emails still have to be written, blog posts composed, website building remains unfinished, and I still need to make progress on the draft of my next book I’m writing.

All the above is true as I started up my business, and I know that I’m not alone. Sometimes, things can be hectic for the life of a writer. Once you’ve published books, there are always book promotions, marketing work, and even answering fan questions to be done.

Yet, it’s all worth it. Seeing the book you have created, in print, in your hands, and finding it better to what you could have possibly dreamed, is worth more than all the work you put into it.

I would like to give you a path to success. You have a story in your mind. Maybe, it’s one you have wanted to tell for a long time. The trick is in getting it down on paper. It all comes down to that. In my Writing Imagination Academy course, I give you just that: A map. With that map, you can be guided to your journey’s end.

Here’s how to apply.

Sign up to my email using the button at the bottom of this post. Once you’ve watched the video training you receive in your welcome email, send me an email to apply for the Writing Imagination Academy. In that email, describe your idea for a story in a couple paragraphs using a few of the action points from the free video training (you’ll know what they are when you watch the videos!) Don’t worry. The email doesn’t have to be big. All I really want to know is what your story is generally about, a few things the main characters might do, and some idea of your story setting. These ideas don’t have to be too well formulated. The only reason I require this is because there are certain stories that I cannot make fit within my model for what a good story is. However, if you’ve been agreeing with my blog recently, then the chances are you will be accepted!

I only allow 50 seats per WIA course. Go to my home page: www.conservativecornerstones.com to see how many seats are available and when the next Writing Imagination Academy course begins! Application for the course must be completed before the course begins.

Your fellow writer,
Joshua Reynolds

P.S. Sometimes, I will listen to nature sounds when I write. Ever tried it? Here’s one to get you started: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euEwKtP5CG4

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Writing a Story from Beginning to End that Exceeds Your Expectations – Your Turn

It’s the moment you’ve been waiting for: The brief list – to the point – of what needs to happen for your novel to be published.

1. Understanding what good storytelling is.
2. Making writing an enjoyable, inspired, and fun task.
3. Understanding how you gain imagination and inspiration for stories from things around you.
4. Explore your imagined and inspired images.
5. Create your outline.
6. Write your first draft.
7. Revise your story.

Remember how much you enjoyed stories as a child? How is it that you could turn a stuffed animal and a bedroom into an entirely different world? You can re-enter that imagination and create more imaginative, more defined, and more inspirational stories than you’ve ever imagined before.

In Writing Imagination Academy, I cover all seven of the above points and more. That’s right – this is a service that ordinarily would cost thousands of dollars to invest in. I’m giving it to you for a fraction of that amount.

It all comes as part of Writing Imagination Academy that costs a flat fee of $200. You pay this fee after I accept you into the program. If you are accepted, you will receive five extra modules of video training, four coaching calls, and a chapter evaluation of your story. The program takes 8 weeks to complete, and your first draft should be completed by then! The last module deals with how to revise and smooth that draft out into a finished manuscript, and from there, the road consists of merely applying everything you have learned.

I only allow 50 seats per WIA course. Go to my home page to see how many seats are available and when the next Writing Imagination Academy course begins! Application for the course must be completed before the course begins.

Your fellow writer,
Joshua Reynolds

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The Forbidden Secret of Writing – Get This Wrong and Your Novel Will Never Sell

Innocence. That is the secret ingredient to writing. Innocence.

If your main characters know too much, it will be a poor story. If the reader knows too much in the first chapter, it will be a poor story. If the story could not be understood by a twelve year old, it will be a poor story. If the story is not innocent, it will not be a good story.

After years of writing, I began to realize that the reason why a lot of literature being written today is not long-lasting is because people don’t know how to write a story. They don’t know what good storytelling actually is and what it isn’t. What’s more, those who do know what good storytelling is often can’t seem to plow through the first draft of their story. I, myself, experienced a lot of difficulties getting through the first draft of my second novel, and it lay in tatters for nearly a year before I went back and refined it for publication.

All this led me to a conclusion: People need to be trained in what good storytelling is and how to achieve it. In the ancient days, storytelling was something taught and practiced like math is today. The bards were a respected class.

It is through storytelling that we perceive much of the world around us – stories that are real as well as stories that aren’t real but that could be real. Understanding what good storytelling is and how to write and think it has helped me immensely in my daily life. Garbage in equals garbage out. In other words, if we put garbage into our minds, then garbage will be the result. It is easy for people to understand this when talking about food. If all a person eats is hamburgers and French fries, then their health will quickly deteriorate. Yet, the same applies with storytelling. If we immerse ourselves in bad stories, then the results will be an unhealthy life. Yet, good stories do the exact opposite! By learning good storytelling, my inspiration for stories has increased, my imagination is no longer something foreboding but is rather something that can easily be shared with others through storytelling, and I have a deeper understanding and appreciation for the wholesomeness that creates healthy society. And it’s not just me. FACT: Those who read wholesome stories are more content in their lives and are more creative in their thinking.

In six constructed modules of Writing Imagination Academy, I lead you from conceptualizing your story through your own inspiration to a finished manuscript that is ready for publication. You’re in the driver’s seat! I’m just sitting in the passenger seat navigating you to your own destination. What if you could see your dreams brought down on paper and for a fraction of the cost most book consultants/editors request?

You are walking down the dusty road in the moonlight toward your destination. Need more help than what I give for free? Sign up to my course! Begin by filling out the form after clicking the button at the bottom of this list. Watch my free video training and apply!

Your fellow writer,
Joshua Reynolds

P.S. Here’s a great article I found on tips with how to overcome writer’s block. Enjoy! https://www.thebalance.com/top-tips-for-overcoming-writer-s-block-1277776

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How to Stop Destroying Your Story and Write With Imagination

Here’s a secret: You can get rid of your boring novel and write something that exceeds your own imagination. Yes, you can. I know you have a story. And you can tell that story in a jaw-dropping, heart-gripping, endearing way.

First, let me describe what many people face in the modern world.

They get up in the morning, and their minds are still lingering on the movie they watched last night. Its dismal view of the world lingers in their heads as they attempt to find inspiration for another day. Yet, every day seems to become harder. The more Hollywood films they watch and the more dime-a-dozen fictional books they read, the less motivation they have to walk through another day. In fact, they find that most modern stories only want them to walk away from the world, as though there was some other place where they could avoid everything in life.

1.    Their minds are constantly plagued by stories they find exhausting.
2.    Living in these stories ruins their family relationships.
3.    They find themselves lonely in these stories.
4.    The world was a place they remember being nice when they were children, but now, they strangely do not find it so.

If you suffer from any of the above… if your mind is reeling with a desire for a different story… if you are not completely satisfied with the way Hollywood portrays the world…If you suffer from a lack of inspiration… if you cannot seem to get through the first draft of your story… if you are daily frustrated by your writing and your book isn’t measuring up to the way you imagined it to be… if you want your story to be more imaginative, inspirational, and wholesome…

then Writing Imagination Academy is just for you. Here’s why…

In Writing Imagination Academy, I take you through a step by step process on how to write a good novel from beginning to end, and this process works! Not only do I get you past all the levels and layers of writer’s block and how to find your story from inspiration, but I also show you what a truly good novel entails and how to give your story a redeeming theme that will last a lifetime in the hearts of your readers.

And you need to realize, there is a cost to not writing stories with proper imagination. If you continue struggling through your novel with no sense of direction, it just gets worse.

What most beginner writers do when facing Writer’s Block or a lack of inspiration and imagination is write a page here or there – or even shelve the project for a while. But for most people, none of that works.

1. They drag their first draft out until they finally quit.
2. Their book sounds disjointed because they only write now and then.
3. In the end, their story doesn’t match up with how they envisioned it and so they are dissatisfied with it.

And what happens if you just do nothing? If you just keep doing what you’ve been doing? Your novel will lie in tatters, and you will be embarrassed to show it to any of your friends. Worse, if you ever do complete your story without realizing what a good novel actually is, you will exhaust your readers, your ratings on Amazon and Goodreads will all be negative, and you will be known as a low-grade author whose books are second or third rate.

But, it doesn’t have to be this way. In another post, I would like to outline for you how I teach writing. For now, let me provide you with some more free information:

What makes a story exhausting and dismal is twofold: (1) Places are not described well and in a compelling way. That is, the story’s characters do not have the right level of interaction with the place/scene, and the reader cannot imagine the place his/herself. (2) There isn’t a theme of redemption. The truth is, if you leave no hope to the reader – no refreshing scenes that they can turn back to at any time day or night, then soon, they will abandon your story. Or if they read through it, they won’t want to linger in it long.

Lesson: When you write a story that encourages healthy society, the chances increase for it being a long-lasting classic.

Right now, you have an idea of where you want to go, but do you have the road map? What does the schematic look like in your mind? In Writing Imagination Academy, I open up to you the schematic you have inside your head. Your story. Your destination. You’re the hero. I’m only here to help. Apply today!

Your fellow writer,
Joshua Reynolds

P.S. Want some heavy, hard-reading, deep words on what I think healthy society entails? Read this post (warning, it’s thick reading!)!

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The Top Ten Reasons Why Your First Draft Isn’t Complete

“I’m writing a first draft and reminding myself that I’m simply shoveling sand into a box so later I can build castles.” ~Shannon Hale.

“It is better to write a bad first draft than to write no first draft at all.” ~Will Shetterly

“Writing the last page of the first draft is the most enjoyable moment in writing. ~Nicholas Sparks

Below, I delve into the meat and potatoes of the top ten most common mistakes that result in a first draft of a story never being completed. However . . . I have a promise to keep, first!

In a previous post, I said that I would talk a little more about my Writing Imagination Academy course. I’m going to begin by making a shocking statement: Over 50% of the novels in your local library should not exist. Have you ever picked up a book, began reading it, and promptly set it down to never return to it? Or have you ever enjoyed a story the first read-through to find that afterward you were exhausted? You don’t want to go back to it because since you know everything that happened, it can no longer keep you at the edge of your seat.

Both of these sorts of stories are examples of poor storytelling. There are so many stories being told today that give dismal views of life, takes away a reader’s imagination, have poorly described places, and altogether shouldn’t exist. Don’t get me wrong! I think there are a lot of good stories as well. Personally, I usually like stories that have stood the test of time, though there are some good treasures being written today. The trick is in finding them.

In Writing Imagination Academy, I show what an imaginative, inspirational, and wholesome story is and how to write one. It starts by understanding what inspired you to write your story and continues by describing how your imagination should flow onto the page so your story exceeds your own expectations! You’re driving and I’m navigating. Tell me where you want to go, and I’ll help you! Go to my home page to find when my next class is, and apply today!

And now, onto your first draft – after all, you’re probably saying right now, “But Joshua, I need help this minute with my writing!”

Here are the top ten mistakes people make with Draft One:

1. You began without preparation.

Before you begin writing your story, minimal preparation that should be done is: Research your story for accuracy (even if you’re creating a world yourself, you should be well aware of what other people are doing); Obtain reference images for your own inspiration; write about the images you have imagined; gain information like character names, places your story will take place in, and so on; and from your inspired and imagined images, create an outline.

2. You haven’t made writing a habit.

In order for your first draft to be written, you need to make writing a daily habit in your life. If you don’t, then you are not a writer but a dabbler.

3. Fear.

You’re too afraid of how your book will be received. For your first draft, it’s best to not think about such things at all. Think of it this way: Your writing is just you and your writing instrument.

4. Editing.

Something I learned years ago, if you want to get through a first draft, don’t edit!!! Write all the way through, and then you can go back and edit. That’s what drafts two and three are for.

5. Discouragement.

You become discouraged when you don’t see your book living up to your expectations. Don’t worry! Rarely, if at all, will a first draft live up to one’s expectations. Remember the quotes at the top of this email. The first draft is a stepping stone.

6. You’re writing too slow.

The longer a first draft drags out, the less chance you have of ever completing it. Why? Because we all have busy lives! Things come up, and soon, it can be easy to shelve your book project. Don’t do this! Write your first draft quickly.

7. Distractions.

Distractions are easy when you have picked the wrong writing environment. Try writing in a different sort of environment and see what happens.

8. Not knowing where to begin.

It is hard to begin some days. You sit down with your writing instrument in hand and don’t know how to get moving. At such a stall, go back to some of the material you collected before you began writing Draft One and look it over. Remember all your inspiration, and try to write about that on your page. After all, that’s supposed to be your story.

9. Having a dis-joint plot.

Sometimes, after writing for a while, you can realize the plot-line you came up with wasn’t the best and should have been tweaked in your outline stage. If this happens, don’t panic. Tweak the plot, but don’t go back to make everything match. Finish the draft. Then you can go back and revise.

10. Not enough words.

Vocabulary is something that can occasionally run dry. You find yourself repeating the same words. Sometimes, this is okay, but make sure that every scene is unique. Even if you mention the word “sunshine” in every chapter twenty times, talk about it in different ways: It’s spilling through limbs and boughs, shooting across the field, rising in the morning, gleaming through the window, beaming behind the mountain.

Your fellow writer,
Joshua Reynolds

P.S. In my Writing Imagination Academy course, you will receive five modules full of videos with invaluable information that can aid you in your writing. I plan to delve more into this course in subsequent posts. Want to know more now? Sign up to my email list and find out (button below)!

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Have You Made These Mistakes in Your Novel

The first thing I want you to know is this: The problems you are having with your novel are not unique to you, and I’ve been there myself.

Let me describe your unfinished novel: It’s unfinished. And it’s been unfinished for years. Or maybe, you’re new to writing stories, and you have just started. That’s great! However, your novel still isn’t finished (because you’ve only begun). Maybe, you’ve published several novels and are only wanting to see how someone else does it. Welcome aboard!

However, your current novel is still unfinished. You cannot seem to make headway with the storyline. Your characters are un-relatable to you and therefore will be un-relatable to your readers. Your scenes cannot be pictured and are poorly described.

. . .not having these problems? That’s wonderful! You’re above the average storyteller. However, for most of us (even for professionals), writing stories can be hard. It’s irritating because we know we had the BEST novel idea when we started, but as the story progresses, it doesn’t measure up to our vision. It doesn’t measure up to your vision. You had the best inspired image in your mind, but developing it onto paper can be hard.

The hardest part is merely beginning – every day, sitting down with pen and paper (or a word-processor) and beginning. Re-starting your story at a different point every . . . single . . . day.

This is my end point for today: In order to write your novel, you need to write, even if you feel like you are only restarting your book in a different sentence, a different paragraph, a different chapter. Thus is the difficulty with the first draft. It’s difficult, and that’s OKAY! Your first draft is your “junk draft”. It will not be good. Yet, be satisfied with it. Get through it as quickly as you can. Then, you can revise it. Even professionals don’t like their first draft. Yet, we learn to take some thrills from it. We enjoy writing it even though we know it needs improvement. The principle, though, is to write it. Don’t shelve it! Get it written, and I guarantee you, you’ll want to revise it until you have a finished manuscript.

Need some more free pointers? Read my Writing Methodology Checklist you receive when you fill out the form by clicking the button at the bottom of this post!

Patching up a novel can be difficult. Writing a first draft can be difficult. Developing a story can be difficult. In posts to come, I plan to discuss more about Writing Imagination Academy. Go to my home page to see how much time is left before my next course, and apply today!

Your fellow writer,
Joshua Reynolds

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Do You Have the Courage to Write an Imaginative Novel?

What I’m about to tell you will take courage to hear, but it will take more courage to act on. Writing a story takes imagination. That’s right – it takes the same imagination that as a child made you superman or a princess.

Do you have problems envisioning the scenes of your story? Are your characters fuzzy faced? Can you not picture exactly what they look like or where they live? Can you not taste what they taste or smell what they smell? If your answer is yes to any of these, then you lack imagination at some level.

Now, don’t worry! All writers lack imagination at some level. It takes time to build imagination up in one’s mind. Yet, one thing is certain: Without imagination, your story will go nowhere.

Picture two stories in your mind:
(1) An author is sitting under a tree in a park on a sunny afternoon with notebook and pen in hand. As he breathes the fresh air, he smells something different under him. It’s the smell of rich dirt. At the moment, he is writing a scene about rain. His main character is out in the mid-afternoon weather, forced to work his occupation in the mud by a sad set of circumstances. Yet, the character starts singing to himself a song to cheer his own spirits. It’s a song about gardening a flower garden. The author looks up for a moment from his work to see the flowers waving in the gentle breeze in a short flower bed across from him. He remembers the taste of herbal tea, planted in a similar bed of earth, and that brings him later to the scene when the main character, late at evening, is sitting back at his home, drying himself from the rainwater and drinking a mug of freshly brewed, still steaming tea.
(2) An author is sitting under a tree in a park on a sunny afternoon with notebook and pen in hand. He, too, is thinking about the fresh air, flowers, and sunlight. Yet, his main character is not present. Instead, his story is far off and un-reaching. His character is supposed to be riding his horse through town on a sunny day, warning the townsmen and women of an imminent danger. Yet, he doesn’t know what the character is smelling or thinking or saying, except that the story outline mentions something about war abroad in Europe.

What is the difference between these two authors, and why is it that the second author, though in the same place as the first, can’t write the scene of his story?

Imagination. Imagination must draw upon the real world, as you saw the first author in my example do. Don’t be misled by the conventional definition of imagination. The Merriam Webster dictionary defines imagination as “the act or power of forming a mental image of something not present to the senses or never before wholly perceived in reality”. I want to focus on the word “wholly” because though imagination is something not wholly perceived, it draws a lot upon that which is wholly perceived.

My point is this: If you are not using your experiences/the world to form your imagination, you will not be able to imagine! So, how do you draw from the world?

Reference images. Look up images that can inspire your scenes. Go places to see them, look them up online, drive to art galleries where you can gain references, draw them yourself if you can, gain them from stories you like (reference images can be words – they don’t have to be pictures). I talk a lot more about reference images in my free video training (click the button at the bottom of this post to receive them!). Yet, sometimes, we need examples. Read this post of mine if you want to know some images I used for my third novel that helped to springboard my imagination.

Your fellow writer,
Joshua Reynolds

P.S. I can give you pointers all the way, but if you need more, I would love to see you inside Writing Imagination Academy. Apply now! Send me an email with a couple paragraphs explaining your story using some information in my free video training, and I’ll get back with you!

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It’s a Shame Your Novel Lies in Tatters, When the Steps are Simple!

“One of the hardest things about being a writer is actually finishing that first draft. We often linger on the details, editing as we go, which in many cases causes us to run out of steam and quit.”~Writer’s Digest

My guess is that for a long time, maybe years, you have thought about writing a novel of some kind. You would not be alone. I spent over six years writing two complete drafts of two different novels and revising them. . .yet this wasn’t enough. The stories were written at a grade-school level at best, and their content was a knockoff from someone else’s stories anyway. The truth was, I didn’t know how to spring board true imagination within me that could be transferred into something on a page.

Do you feel like your story is in the same boat? You’ve struggled with coming up with all the scenes you know you need to imagine. When friends ask you how your story is going, you mumble something about life happening and not having time to write. You keep saying next month, next year, sometime soon, you’ll complete it. Secretly, you know you never will – not if you keep on the same trajectory.

My free Module of training videos you receive when you sign up to my email list (join at the bottom of this post) should put you well on the way to victory! Except. . .not quite.

The problem is that your story that you know you have imagined in your head can’t come down on paper – and when you try to put it on paper, it usually comes out different from your vision.

Don’t worry! I’m here with an answer. All I ask is a few minutes of your time and to ponder a question: Do you want to succeed? Watch the below video over your coffee or tea break (I love tea – drink it nearly every day).

Video: https://youtu.be/RFR2d7JlOmw

Ask yourself: Do you want to succeed at writing? Not ready to make a decision? Still trying to gain all the free material you can? That’s great! Here is a bullet point list on choosing a good writing environment:

1. Think about what sort of environment you were in when you first thought of your story and try to recreate it.
2. What environment do you like reading in? If it’s quiet, write in a quiet place. If it’s loud, write in a loud place. Chances are that your concentration for writing and reading will be the same!
3. Come up with a set of places (no more than five) that you know you have available in your writing time. Trial and error writing in these places to see which works best for you!

Your fellow writer,
Joshua Reynolds

P.S. Here is an article sharing many tips about writing. (Note: The author’s method’s are slightly different than mine at times, yet there is a lot of meat to what he said here.) https://goinswriter.com/tips-writing-book/

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