RC Sproul and Lindsey Grahm: Latest from YouTube

Get the latest from my YouTube channel:

As I continue working on to the end of this year, one marketing venue I have been working to improve is my YouTube channel. It is still a little below professional quality, yet I have been cranking out several videos a week and probably have the quality about as good as it can get with my current camera. I plan to be switching tactics next semester and instead of creating six videos a week, create and release two videos a week. One will be less quality, and the other I will be implementing a new strategy to improve its quality. We’ll see where all that goes, but for now, I thought I would leave you with the last few videos that are hot off the presses!

 

This last video is very special to me now that our dear Rev. Dr. RC Sproul has passed from this life to be with His Holy Lord and Savior. When I created this video (it’s takes some time from filming to publication), I had no idea that within a few weeks, RC Sproul would die. I know his preaching has affected so many. The below text was a very small tribute I gave him in the comments section of a couple of the Ligonier Ministries YouTube channel videos:

I think that RC Sproul has been the most influential Christian in the Reformed faith since the Westminster assembly first drafted the Westminster Standards. He has definitely been the most influential contemporary theologian in my family’s understanding of what reformed teaching is. May God raise up another man like RC Sproul to continue preaching in full strength and with similar zeal the truth and essence of reformed theology. I’m glad that Ligonier ministries is prepared to continue without their dear and faithful leader, and I also realize the difficult standard by which they must measure up to in his absence. God bless the Sproul family.

I could not end this note without also giving gratitude for RC’s optimistic eschatological teachings, as I am a Postmillennialist, and my father taught me much of what I know about the Olivet Discourse from RC Sproul’s sermons on it.

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Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

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Children’s Hour

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Swallow Tails

I lie in the hay,
And watch the way
The swallows fly out and in all day.
From the hay on the floor,
The live-long day,
I watch the way
They swoop in and out through the old barn door.

In their nests of clay,
I hear them say
Whatever they say to the little ones there.
They twitter and cheep,
For that is the way,
Whatever they say,
The swallows put their children – and me – to sleep.
~Tom Robinson

The Brown Thrush

There’s a merry brown thrush sitting up in the tree,
He’s singing to me! He’s singing to me!
And what does he say, little girl, little boy?
“Oh, the world’s running over with joy!
Don’t you hear? Don’t you see?
Hush! Look! In my tree,
I’m as happy as happy can be!”

And the brown thrush keeps singing, “A nest do you see,
And five eggs hid by me in the juniper tree?
Don’t meddle! Don’t touch, little girl, little boy,
Or the world will lose some of its joy!
Now I’m glad! Now I’m free!
And I always shall be,
If you never bring sorrow to me.”

So the merry brown thrush sings away in the tree,
To you and to me, to you and to me;
And he sings all the day, little girl, little boy,
“Oh, the world’s running over with joy!
But long it won’t be,
Don’t you know? Don’t you see?
Unless we’re as good as can be!”
~Lucy Larcorn

The Woodpecker

The woodpecker pecked out a little round hole
And made him a house in the telephone pole.
One day when I watched he poked out his head,
And he had on a hood and a collar of red.

When the streams of rain pour out of the sky,
And the sparkles of lightning go flashing by,
And the big, big wheels of thunder roll,
He can snuggle back in the telephone pole.
~Elizabeth Madox Roberts

The Night Will Never Stay

The night will never stay,
The night will still go by,
Though with a million stars
You pin it to the sky;

Though you bind it with the blowing wind
And buckle it with the moon,
The night will slip away
Like sorrow or a tune.
~Eleanor Farjeon

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Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

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Children’s Hour

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Grasshopper Green

Grasshopper Green is a comical chap;
He lives on the best of fare.
Bright little trousers, jacket, and cap,
These are his summer wear.
Out in the meadow he loves to go,
Playing away in the sun;
It’s hoppety, skipperty, high and low,
Summer’s the time for fun.

Grasshopper Green has a quaint little house;
It’s under the hedge so gay.
Grandmother Spider, as still as a mouse,
Watches him over the way.
Gladly he’s calling the children, I know,
Out in the beautiful sun;
It’s hoppety, skipperty, high and low,
Summer’s the time for fun.
~Author Unknown

Minnows

. . . Swarms of minnows show their little heads,
Staying their waxy bodies ‘gainst the streams,
To taste the luxury of sunny beams
Tempered with coolness. How they ever wrestle
With their own sweet delight, and ever nestle
Their silver bellies on the pebbly sand.
If you but scantily hold out the hand,
That very instant not one will remain;
But turn your eye, and they are there again.
The ripples seem right glad to reach those cresses,
And cool themselves among the em’rald tresses;
The while they cool themselves, they freshness give,
And moisture, that the bowery green may live.
~John Keats

Mice

I think mice
Are rather nice

Their tails are long,
Their faces small,
They haven’t any
Chins at all.
Their ears are pink,
Their teeth are white,
They run about
The house at night.
They nibble things
They shouldn’t touch
And no one seems
To like them much

But I think mice
Are nice
~Rose Fyleman

The City Mouse and the Garden Mouse

The city mouse lives in a house;-
The garden mouse lives in a bower,
He’s friendly with the frogs and toads,
And sees the pretty plants in flower.

The city mouse eats bread and cheese;-
The garden mouse eats what he can;
We will not grudge him seeds and stocks,
Poor little timid furry man.
~Christina Rossetti

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Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

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Discourse with the Gamekeeper – Added Scene

This is for those familiar with my book Treasure on the Southern Moor:

.     Adrianna stepped below the main deck, descending down the ladder that took her to the middle of the gun deck. She would always see Mr. Heath there around that time inspecting the gun ports. Sunlight was filtering through the open holes and shinning on the freshly oiled cannon. Adrian used to always have to walk with her down this way especially after the three week storm. Yet, over the last couple weeks, she had ventured down by herself.
.     Once she stepped below the gun deck down to the supply deck, she was once more reminded of the night, seeming so long ago and yet still fresh in her mind when the loyal crew defended the ship against Mr. Northrup and his men. Most everything had been put back to its original place, but some of the barrels still formed a half barricade just to remind the faithful crew what almost befell them. Adrianna smiled at the molasses barrel.
.     The sounds of the crew members talking above were muted, yet the sounds of the creaking of the ship sounded louder and more threatening. Adrianna shuttered, as she always did, at thinking how it must have sounded for Adrian in the storm, when he would go down to the supply deck to fetch something for the cook or another crew member.
.     Then, lifting the hatch to the cargo deck below, Adrianna descended into darkness, down into the deep of the Southern Moor. She went quickly aft, feeling the ceiling with her fingertips until she caught hold of a lantern, which she promptly lit. Then, she continued her way aft past the pump house and toward the stable door. No matter how long they stayed aboard ship, Adrianna could never get used to the way the walls sloped outward on this deck. There was more ceiling than floor, and it always looked as though the ship would tip over at any moment, though it never did.
.     The stable door was unlocked, but Adrianna always knocked.
.     “Come in, come in!” said a voice from inside, and Adrianna knew it to be the gamekeeper.
.     “Thank you, Mr. Ducks,” said Adrianna. “May I see the ox?”
.     “I suppose you may,” said Jemmy Ducks, “yet remember what I said about getting too attached to it, ma’am. I hardly had the nerve to do my duty the first time I was gamekeeper aboard ship – I became such close friends with the animals.”
.     “I know, and I suppose you’re right,” said Adrianna. “Poor things,” she continued, “stuck down here every day and every night, without any hope of living in fresh sunlight again. Do you think?”
.     “I’m afraid we must eventually,” said Jemmy Ducks. “That is, after all, why they were brought with us, miss – to provide us with a few more square and honest meals, and I suppose the crew does need it.”
.     “But it’s nice to tend them in the meantime,” said Adrianna.
.     Then, in the far distance above them, they could hear the bell toll, and a very faint voice was calling out, “Land ho!”

To learn more about Treasure on the Southern Moor, please visit my bookstore.

You may purchase this book directly here at Xulon or here at Amazon

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Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

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Mr. Williams Monologue – Added Scene

Hello reader! If you have read The Williams House, the below is meant to be spoken to you.

“Come in, come in on this cold November night. Where do you come from? I say, you’ve had a long road to travel. Please, come to our fireplace in our great family room. Would you like some tea? The kettle was singing only a couple minutes ago. Timothy, take <YOUR NAME>’s coat and hang it in our back hallway. Some of the youngers are already in bed as they were rather tired, and the olders will have to be in bed soon as tomorrow is of course a school day.

“What’s that? Oh, yes, our two leaf piles; rather gigantic, but we’ll be burning them this Saturday. It took two Saturday’s work just to pile them up, though it was mostly the children that did it. Do you like honey or sugar as your sweetener? Honey is my favorite sweetener as well, good! It’s local honey. I think there are also some popovers that are warm. Would you like some?

“Well, we’ve lived in this house for four years now, I should think – came over from England’s shores, you know. You could probably guess the accent. . . .”

He and you talk for two hours time until the fire in the large brick fireplace has died to embers. The older children: Lilly, Ann, Will, Johnathon, and Timothy have went to bed, and your own eyes have become droopy after your second mug of tea. Mr. Williams’s voice tolls on in your head until you realize that he is ushering you to the back hall for your coat. You bid him goodbye, and he bids you safe travels on your journey.

“Have a good night, sir/madam, and safe travels!

You may purchase The Williams House here at Xulon or here at Amazon

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Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

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Recent Readings from My Two Published Books

Hello everyone,

So, I’ve shared my main YouTube channel with all of you several times, but I haven’t mentioned much about my audio readings on this blog because I use them for my websites The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor. But I don’t want you to miss all the fun! Here are a few of my audio recordings:

Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

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Quick Writing Update – Sneak Peek Preview!

Hello everyone,

I’m continuing to write the first draft of my third novel. As previously stated, it is a historical fiction novel set around the turn of the century. This draft I plan to have completed around mid-December. There is a YouTube video close to being published that gives a little tid bit of information on one of the scenes I’ve written, yet I thought I would post a story snippet also below! This comes from Chapter 3, and keep in mind, it’s a first draft!

.     Breakfast consisted of hot popovers, a dish called “toad in the hole”, toast, and mushrooms. It would have ordinarily been a wonderful breakfast, yet the children were anxious to be finished and making their way outside.
.     “Hurry up, Ellsworth,” said Brent half an hour later. “I was done ages ago.”
.     “I’m doing the best I can,” said Ellsworth. “Before we reach the seaside, you’ll all be wishing you had taken longer about breakfast.”
.     “I wonder if Father, Mother, and the others have reached the hospital yet,” said Heather.
.     “They probably have by now,” said Allison.
.     No one else said much about Mother and Father, as they were saying their prayers as instructed, and there wasn’t much else to say, and the more they could think about the outdoors, the less they would worry.
.     Breakfast finished, and a few last remarks said to the servants in an attempt to be polite, the children headed outside through the front door and into the gardens, taking a path that would lead them out to the hill country, and eventually to the seaside. Birds were singing close by, and the garden beds and flowers kept growing as though they hadn’t inkling about Mother’s illness. A few puddles still lay about from the previous night’s rain, yet they were quickly drying up, and most of the grass was now dry except for those areas that had remained in shade.
.     “I’m glad you talked the servants into packing a few sandwiches for our lunch,” said Christopher to Ellsworth. “It means we have all afternoon to be out, until tea-time, I suppose.”
.     “I rather think they don’t want us about,” said Ellsworth.
.     “There were very impolite to us if you ask me,” said Allison. “They treated us just as if we were all two years old.”
.     “Oh, it doesn’t matter,” said Ellsworth. “We should be fine until teatime, anyway.”
.     Bridget was feeling the bark of one of the garden trees, and Brent was trying to climb up its lowest branches. They stood for a few minutes there in the flower gardens, listening to the fountain splashing in the distance. Moss had grown around the base of the tree, and Bridget was just starting to pull at it when Ellsworth spoke up again.
.     “Let’s get started toward the seaside,” he said. “It will take us a few hours to get there, especially if we take a few breaks throughout. Besides,” lowering his voice a little, “I see that gardener in the distance, and he always seems grumpy around us – thinks we’re always messing up the garden beds.” He glanced at Bridget’s bit of work with the moss and began to wonder if the gardener was partially right. “Don’t pull the moss, Bridget,” he said aloud. “He might see it later and be annoyed with us all the more.”
.     They set out from the gardens, walking first at a very brisk pace. That is, it was the fastest Bridget could go without running, and it was somewhere around a comfortable, headstrong walk for Ellsworth, and somewhere in-between for the others. The gardens quickly disappeared behind them and looked much smaller, and before long, they were starting to ascend a few hills.
.     “At least we’re taking a more direct path this time,” said Ellsworth, and so they continued.
.     They stopped to rest three times along the way, and their last rest seemed to take some time, though as none of them had remembered to take a pocket watch along, they didn’t know for sure. All they could see was the sun slowly rising in the sky, though they had been instructed in times past not to look directly at it. There were a few streams that ran across the path they took, and they splashed their faces and waded their feet before moving on.
.     The smell of the sea eventually drew nearer, and finally, after crossing a ridge, they could see the sandy shore stretching out far below them. They found the same path they had gone down before and quickly descended, taking in the fresh sea air with deep, even breaths.
.     “Any sign of the others?” asked Heather as they came to the edge of the sand, taking their shoes and stockings back off to feel the sand with their toes.
.     “They don’t appear to be here, yet,” said Allison, “but those look like ships in the distance.”
.     “I think they wanted us to come to the harbor,” said Ellsworth, “but as I didn’t know how to get there, I thought we could follow it in from the beach.”
.     The sound of the waves could be heard lapping against the sandy shore, and they walked over to where they could pick up pebbles and rocks. They tried skipping them a few minutes and found that Ellsworth and Heather were the only two who were any good at it. Then, they set out to their right, keeping the beach to their left and walking along the sand. In the far distance, they could see many things that must have been the docks, and out at sea other small things that must have been the fishing ships, some of them probably quite large close up.
.     “It must be close to noon, now,” said Christopher. “I say, Ellsworth, what about that lunch that was packed us? We don’t have enough to share with the others, and I’m sure they’ll be eating something else on the docks.”
.     “Well, if you’re all ready for it,” said Ellsworth, “then I suppose we can have our dinner here.”
.     They opened the packs that had been sent them by the servants and divided the food up. There was enough for two sandwiches each, with extra bread and cheese and apples for any who needed more. After walking all that way and splashing their faces in water and playing in the sand, they were all quite hungry. Before they could stop themselves, they finished everything that they had brought along.

Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

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Children’s Hour Biweekly

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Epilogue – The Williams House

Within a summer afternoon,
Among the blowing flowers,
Many young voices strike a tune,
With silver laughs like showers.
They sing and shout and laugh with glee
With much more fun to be.
Hark and listen to hear the sound,
Of all the little tones.
Remember times when you could bound,
O’er hills and dales and stones.
And if you are a little one,
Take time to leap and run!
There is a day to one day be,
When we are ushered in,
To unending moments of glee,
And no more times of sin.
Here, cheerful tones will rise and sing,
All praises to the King.
Remember then that all this life,
Is passing like a breath.
There is no time for any strife,
For soon there will be death.
But then if found in Christ you stand,
Your welcome will be grand!
~by Joshua A. Reynolds

The Magician’s Nephew; from Chapter 15: The End of this Story

.     There were of course all sorts of colored things in the bedroom; the colored counterpane on the bed, the wallpaper, the sunlight from the window, and Mother’s pretty, pale blue dressing jacket. But the moment Digory took the Apple out of his pocket, all those things seemed to have scarcely any color at all. Every one of them, even the sunlight, looked faded and dingy. The brightness of the Apple threw strange lights on the ceiling. Nothing else was worth looking at: you couldn’t look at anything else. And the smell of the Apple of Youth was as if there was a window in the room that opened on Heaven.
.     “Oh, darling, how lovely,” said Digory’s Mother.
.     “You will eat it, won’t you? Please,” said Digory.
.     “I don’t know what the Doctor would say,” she answered. “But really – I almost feel as if I could.”
.     He peeled it and cut it up and gave it to her piece by piece.
. . .
.     Next morning when the Doctor made his usual visit, Digory leaned over the banisters to listen. He heard the Doctor come out with Aunt Letty and say:
.     “Miss Ketterley, this is the most extraordinary case I have known in my whole medical career. It is – it is like a miracle. I wouldn’t tell the little boy anything at present; we don’t want to raise any false hopes. But in my opinion-” then his voice became too low to hear.
. . .
.     About a week after this it was quite certain that Digory’s Mother was getting better. About a fortnight later she was able to sit out in the garden. And a month later that whole house had become a different place. Aunt Letty did everything that Mother liked; windows were opened, frowsy curtains were drawn back to brighten up the rooms, there were new flowers everywhere, and nicer things to eat, and the old piano was tuned and Mother took up her singing again, and had such games with Digory and Polly that Aunt Letty would say “I declare, Mabel, you’re the biggest baby of the three.”
~By C.S. Lewis

from Five Children and It

My Lamb, you are so very small,
You have not learned to read at all;
Yet never a printed book withstands
The urgence of your dimpled hands.
So, though this book is for yourself,
Let mother keep it on the shelf
Till you can read. O days that pass,
That day will come too soon, alas!
~By E. Nesbit

Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

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Children’s Hour – Biweekly

Because I’m pressed with time as I write my third novel and am heavily engaged in marketing my first two, I have decided to make my Children’s Hour posts biweekly. I hope you enjoy!

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Old King Cole

Old King Cole was a merry old soul
And a merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl
And he called for his fiddlers three.

Every fiddler he had a fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he;
Oh there’s none so rare, as can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.
~Mother Goose

Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat

Pussycat, pussycat, where have you been?
I’ve been to London to visit the Queen.
Pussycat, pussycat, what did you there?
I frightened a little mouse under her chair.
~Author Unknown

A Wise Old Owl

A wise old owl sat in an oak,
The more he heard, the less he spoke;
The less he spoke, the more he heard;
Why aren’t we all like that wise old bird?

~Old Nursery Rhyme

Blow Wind Blow

Blow wind, blow
And go, mill, go
That the miller may grind his corn
That the baker may take it
And into bread make it
And bring us a loaf in the morn.

Blow wind, blow
And go, mill, go
That the miller may grind his corn
That the baker may take it
And into bread make it
And bring us a loaf in the morn.
~Old Nursery Rhyme

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Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

eBook Release – YouTube Video

Hello everyone!

I know I’ve already done a blog post about my free eBook, but I wanted to showcase a short rundown of the eBook on YouTube as well. I haven’t created a visual YouTube video for a little while because I’ve been trying to research how to create better YouTube video quality and have been experimenting around with a few things there (and have also been busy writing!).

So, I’m finally getting back around to making more videos. The lighting of the scene is what I worked most on here. I hope you enjoy, and please subscribe to my email list below and receive your free eBook!

Subscribe to my email list and receive my free eBook, titled Rhymes for a Child’s Picnic Lunch, plus email updates, writing news, and more!

Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!