Children’s Hour

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Swallow Tails

I lie in the hay,
And watch the way
The swallows fly out and in all day.
From the hay on the floor,
The live-long day,
I watch the way
They swoop in and out through the old barn door.

In their nests of clay,
I hear them say
Whatever they say to the little ones there.
They twitter and cheep,
For that is the way,
Whatever they say,
The swallows put their children – and me – to sleep.
~Tom Robinson

The Brown Thrush

There’s a merry brown thrush sitting up in the tree,
He’s singing to me! He’s singing to me!
And what does he say, little girl, little boy?
“Oh, the world’s running over with joy!
Don’t you hear? Don’t you see?
Hush! Look! In my tree,
I’m as happy as happy can be!”

And the brown thrush keeps singing, “A nest do you see,
And five eggs hid by me in the juniper tree?
Don’t meddle! Don’t touch, little girl, little boy,
Or the world will lose some of its joy!
Now I’m glad! Now I’m free!
And I always shall be,
If you never bring sorrow to me.”

So the merry brown thrush sings away in the tree,
To you and to me, to you and to me;
And he sings all the day, little girl, little boy,
“Oh, the world’s running over with joy!
But long it won’t be,
Don’t you know? Don’t you see?
Unless we’re as good as can be!”
~Lucy Larcorn

The Woodpecker

The woodpecker pecked out a little round hole
And made him a house in the telephone pole.
One day when I watched he poked out his head,
And he had on a hood and a collar of red.

When the streams of rain pour out of the sky,
And the sparkles of lightning go flashing by,
And the big, big wheels of thunder roll,
He can snuggle back in the telephone pole.
~Elizabeth Madox Roberts

The Night Will Never Stay

The night will never stay,
The night will still go by,
Though with a million stars
You pin it to the sky;

Though you bind it with the blowing wind
And buckle it with the moon,
The night will slip away
Like sorrow or a tune.
~Eleanor Farjeon

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Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

Subscribe to my email list and receive my free eBook, titled Rhymes for a Child’s Picnic Lunch, plus email updates, writing news, and more!

Children’s Hour

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Grasshopper Green

Grasshopper Green is a comical chap;
He lives on the best of fare.
Bright little trousers, jacket, and cap,
These are his summer wear.
Out in the meadow he loves to go,
Playing away in the sun;
It’s hoppety, skipperty, high and low,
Summer’s the time for fun.

Grasshopper Green has a quaint little house;
It’s under the hedge so gay.
Grandmother Spider, as still as a mouse,
Watches him over the way.
Gladly he’s calling the children, I know,
Out in the beautiful sun;
It’s hoppety, skipperty, high and low,
Summer’s the time for fun.
~Author Unknown

Minnows

. . . Swarms of minnows show their little heads,
Staying their waxy bodies ‘gainst the streams,
To taste the luxury of sunny beams
Tempered with coolness. How they ever wrestle
With their own sweet delight, and ever nestle
Their silver bellies on the pebbly sand.
If you but scantily hold out the hand,
That very instant not one will remain;
But turn your eye, and they are there again.
The ripples seem right glad to reach those cresses,
And cool themselves among the em’rald tresses;
The while they cool themselves, they freshness give,
And moisture, that the bowery green may live.
~John Keats

Mice

I think mice
Are rather nice

Their tails are long,
Their faces small,
They haven’t any
Chins at all.
Their ears are pink,
Their teeth are white,
They run about
The house at night.
They nibble things
They shouldn’t touch
And no one seems
To like them much

But I think mice
Are nice
~Rose Fyleman

The City Mouse and the Garden Mouse

The city mouse lives in a house;-
The garden mouse lives in a bower,
He’s friendly with the frogs and toads,
And sees the pretty plants in flower.

The city mouse eats bread and cheese;-
The garden mouse eats what he can;
We will not grudge him seeds and stocks,
Poor little timid furry man.
~Christina Rossetti

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Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

Subscribe to my email list and receive my free eBook, titled Rhymes for a Child’s Picnic Lunch, plus email updates, writing news, and more!

Mr. Williams Monologue – Added Scene

Hello reader! If you have read The Williams House, the below is meant to be spoken to you.

“Come in, come in on this cold November night. Where do you come from? I say, you’ve had a long road to travel. Please, come to our fireplace in our great family room. Would you like some tea? The kettle was singing only a couple minutes ago. Timothy, take <YOUR NAME>’s coat and hang it in our back hallway. Some of the youngers are already in bed as they were rather tired, and the olders will have to be in bed soon as tomorrow is of course a school day.

“What’s that? Oh, yes, our two leaf piles; rather gigantic, but we’ll be burning them this Saturday. It took two Saturday’s work just to pile them up, though it was mostly the children that did it. Do you like honey or sugar as your sweetener? Honey is my favorite sweetener as well, good! It’s local honey. I think there are also some popovers that are warm. Would you like some?

“Well, we’ve lived in this house for four years now, I should think – came over from England’s shores, you know. You could probably guess the accent. . . .”

He and you talk for two hours time until the fire in the large brick fireplace has died to embers. The older children: Lilly, Ann, Will, Johnathon, and Timothy have went to bed, and your own eyes have become droopy after your second mug of tea. Mr. Williams’s voice tolls on in your head until you realize that he is ushering you to the back hall for your coat. You bid him goodbye, and he bids you safe travels on your journey.

“Have a good night, sir/madam, and safe travels!

You may purchase The Williams House here at Xulon or here at Amazon

Subscribe Form

Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

Subscribe to my email list and receive my free eBook, titled Rhymes for a Child’s Picnic Lunch, plus email updates, writing news, and more!

Children’s Hour – Biweekly

Because I’m pressed with time as I write my third novel and am heavily engaged in marketing my first two, I have decided to make my Children’s Hour posts biweekly. I hope you enjoy!

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Old King Cole

Old King Cole was a merry old soul
And a merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl
And he called for his fiddlers three.

Every fiddler he had a fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he;
Oh there’s none so rare, as can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.
~Mother Goose

Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat

Pussycat, pussycat, where have you been?
I’ve been to London to visit the Queen.
Pussycat, pussycat, what did you there?
I frightened a little mouse under her chair.
~Author Unknown

A Wise Old Owl

A wise old owl sat in an oak,
The more he heard, the less he spoke;
The less he spoke, the more he heard;
Why aren’t we all like that wise old bird?

~Old Nursery Rhyme

Blow Wind Blow

Blow wind, blow
And go, mill, go
That the miller may grind his corn
That the baker may take it
And into bread make it
And bring us a loaf in the morn.

Blow wind, blow
And go, mill, go
That the miller may grind his corn
That the baker may take it
And into bread make it
And bring us a loaf in the morn.
~Old Nursery Rhyme

Subscribe to my email list and receive my free eBook, titled Rhymes for a Child’s Picnic Lunch, plus email updates, writing news, and more!

Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books, Young Adult, Historical Fiction / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

Free eBook! Rhymes for a Child’s Picnic Lunch

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Hello everyone. I have finally made a free eBook for my website! If you desire to get the whole eBook, please subscribe to this blog (on the right side of the screen just under the search feature)! For those who have already subscribed, the link should be in the textbox below the search feature. Below are a few more sample screenshots of the inside. You can also find these screenshots on my Story Previews page. Enjoy and please subscribe!

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Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

Children’s Hour – past deadline!

Hello everyone! I’m sorry that I am just now getting around to my Children’s Hour post. It has been a crazy weekend!

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The Rooks

The rooks are building on the trees;
They build there every spring:
‘Caw, caw,’ is all they say,
For none of them can sing.

They’re up before the break of day,
And up till late at night;
For they must labour busily
As long as it is light.

And many a crooked stick they bring,
And many a slender twig,
And many a tuft of moss, until
Their nests are round and big.

‘Caw, caw.’ Oh, what a noise
They make in rainy weather!
Good children always speak by turns,
But rooks all talk together.
~Aunt Effie (Jane Euphemia Browne)

Pleasant Changes

Summer’s sun is warm and bright,
Winter’s snow is cold and white,
Autumn brings the sheaves of grain,
Spring will scatter flowers again;
Pleasant changes
God arranges
All throughout the year!

First there’s darkness then there’s light,
First we’ve day and then we’ve night,
First we’re hot and then we’re cold,
First we’re young and then we’re old;
Are we knowing
Where we’re going,
What we’re doing here?
~Aunt Effie (Jane Euphemia Browne)

[As to that last poem, if you don’t know where you’re going, read the below poem and put your faith in Jesus.]

Above the Bright Blue Sky

There’s a Friend for little children
Above the bright blue sky,
A Friend who never changes,
Whose love will never die;
Our earthly friends may fail us,
And change with changing years,
This Friend is always worthy
Of that dear name [H]e bears

There’s a home for little children
Above the bright blue sky,
Where Jesus reigns in glory,
A home of peace and joy;
No home on earth is like it,
Nor can with it compare;
And everyone is happy,
Nor could be happier there.
~Albert Midlane

Walking Song

We waited for an omnibus,
In which there was no room for us,
But Right foot first, then Left, his brother,
Tried which could overtake the other;
And that’s the way,
With nought to pay,
To do without an omnibus,
In which there is no room for us.
~William E. Hickson

Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

Bookstore Back Up and Book Release!

First off, the Xulon Press Bookstore is back up! You may purchase my book The Williams House there directly at: http://www.xulonpress.com/bookstore/bookdetail.php?PB_ISBN=9781498496216&HC_ISBN=

Also. . . .

Treasure on the Southern Moor is finally in print!

You can now buy this book directly from the Xulon Press bookstore as well! http://www.xulonpress.com/bookstore/bookdetail.php?PB_ISBN=9781545607206&HC_ISBN= I am currently emailing my production team regarding book orders and will be doing a video rundown of my book Treasure on the Southern Moor as soon as I have the printed book in my hands.

Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

 

Children’s Hour

Here is my children’s hour weekend post. Enjoy!

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Pussy

I like little pussy, her coat is so warm;
And if I don’t hurt her, she’ll do me no harm.
So I’ll not pull her tail, nor drive her away,
But pussy and I very gently will play.
She shall sit by my side, and I’ll give her some food;
And she’ll love me because I am gentle and good.

I’ll pat pretty pussy, and then she will purr;
And thus show her thanks for my kindness to her.
But I’ll not pinch her ears, nor tread on her paw,
Lest I should provoke her to use her sharp claw.
I never will vex her, nor make her displeased-
For pussy don’t like to be worried and teased.
~Anonymous

 The Months

January brings snow,
Makes our feet and fingers glow.

February brings the rain,
Thaws the frozen lake again.

March brings breezes loud and shrill,
Stirs the dancing daffodil.

April brings the primrose sweet,
Scatters daisies at our feet.

May brings flocks of pretty lambs,
Skipping by their fleecy dams.

June brings tulips, lilies, roses,
Fills the children’s hands with posies.

Hot July brings cooling showers,
Apricots and gillyflowers.

August brings the sheaves of corn,
Then the harvest home is borne.

Warm September brings the fruit,
Sportsmen then begin to shoot.

Fresh October brings the pheasant,
Then to gather nuts is pleasant.

Dull November brings the blast,
Then the leaves are whirling fast.

Chill December brings the sleet,
Blazing fire, and Christmas treat.
~Sara Coleridge

The City Child,

Dainty little maiden, whither would you wander?
Whither from this pretty home, the home where mother dwells?
‘Far and far away,’ said the dainty little maiden,
‘All among the gardens, auriculas, anemones,
Roses and lilies and Canterbury-bells.’

Dainty little maiden, whither would you wander?
Whither from this pretty house, this city house of ours?
‘Far and far away,’ said the dainty little maiden,
‘All among the meadows, the clover and the clematis,
Daisies and kingcups and honeysuckle-flowers.’
~Lord Tennyson

 

Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!

Bookstore Down!!!

For any who have tried to make recent purchases of my book The Williams House, the Xulon Bookstore is currently down. I do not know the reason for this and am trying to get in touch with my production coordinator to see when/if the issue will be resolved. I know that the Xulon offices were evacuated because of hurricane Irma, yet they I do not think were damaged badly because they have been mentioning resuming work, and I do not know whether or not that is the cause of the bookstore being down.

Regardless, in the meantime, I am linking to where you can purchase my book on Amazon. Please visit this link to buy my book The Williams House: https://www.amazon.com/Williams-House-Joshua-Reynolds/dp/1498496210/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1486162225&sr=8-15

Thank you!

Joshua Reynolds on Conservative Cornerstones – Author of Children’s Books / Family Stories – Finding Conservative Thought in Olde Books. Check out my Authoring Conservatism Post. Look up my two books, The Williams House and Treasure on the Southern Moor in my bookstore!